census 2020

Photo by Justin Criado

 The city is demoing a new mobile asphalt vehicle over the next four months in hopes of fixing the pesky pothole problem. A demonstration was held Wednesday, April 15 at the corner of Sandusky and General Robinson Streets in North Shore.

census 2020

By Justin Criado

While the weather is the reason for the season, so to say, Pittsburghers know that as winter turns to spring, pothole season is in full bloom.

Driving through many a city street may feel like cruising over moon craters, and even when avoiding potholes, you hit them.

But the city may have the pothole solution as it’s demoing a new mobile asphalt vehicle over the next four months, and held a demonstration Wednesday, April 15 at the corner of Sandusky and General Robinson Streets in North Shore.

“With this new vehicle we have the ability 24-7, 12 months a year to fill potholes,” Mayor Bill Peduto said.

The RoadMixer 10 heats-up, mixes and lays asphalt on-site as well as prepares the potholes for filling.

Filling potholes in the winter when they are most prevalent is difficult because asphalt plants aren’t open and cold patch, which is a bag of concrete-like mix, often deteriorates quickly, according to Peduto.

“We have to use cold patch and cold patch falls apart,” Peduto said. “Now at least we have one member of our bullpen that will have the ability to go out and seal it and make it right.”

The city’s Equipment Leasing Agency is responsible for the funds that secured the mixer and truck for four months, and if all goes smoothly, the city can purchase one and have it on the road by mid-November, according to chief operations officer Guy Costa.

The total cost for the RoadMixer and a truck would be $375,000, according to Costa.

Peduto and City Council President Bruce Kraus both admitted that potholes and the condition of the roadways are among the top issues they hear about from citizens.

“The three biggest issues I face are taxes, roads and police so it’s in the Top 3,” Peduto said. “I think that when people think of the delivery of city services they think about what it is that affects them on a daily basis.”

Kraus added: “Clearly you’re seeing our commitment to improving our infrastructure and our roads.”

DSC_9593Photo by Justin Criado

Pittsburgh Public Works employees demonstrate how the RoadMixer 10 works during a demonstration at the corner of Sandusky and General Robinson Streets in North Shore Wednesday, April 15.