Cyberpunk Apocalypse writers move in on Boyle Street. (Photo courtesy Daniel McCloskey).

A new writers residency program is coming to the Central Northside called Cyberpunk Apocalypse.

Cyberpunk Apocalypse is a nonprofit “literary lab” founded by Daniel McCloskey that houses and harbors the talents of resident and visiting writers and cartoonists.

Cyberpunk Apocalypse will be the second writers’ residency program to find a home in the Central Northside, where City of Asylum hosts exiled writers from abroad.

The literary lab has been located in a house in Upper Lawrenceville since its inception three years ago, but McCloskey said there are several advantages to the new location on Boyle Street in the Central Northside that include being close to other arts organizations.

“There’s a lot of arts organizations and potential for collaboration,” said McCloskey who said they’ve found a welcoming community in the Northside.

Even while boxes were still being unpacked on Boyle Street, Cyberpunk Apocalypse was already working with City of Asylum and the New Hazlett Theater on grants for which the two nonprofits are acting as fiscal sponsors.

McCloskey said that while Cyberpunk Apocalypse is growing into a larger physical location, the organization is also evolving into a more mature nonprofit and hopes to become a 501c organization.

Cyberpunk Apocalypse has benefited from its older and wiser neighbors at City of Asylum who have been ready and willing to help McCloskey and the writers get settled.

 “City of Asylum is an amazing organization, and they’ve been great to have,” said McCloskey.  

The six-bedroom Boyle Street house also offers more space and an additional bedroom for visiting writers as well as a performance space on the first floor that once served as the punk venue, The Mousetrap.

Going forward, Cyberpunk Apocalypse hopes to continue its Northside collaborations and grow to be a unique part of the Central Northside community.  

“We really like it here. There’s more of an east coast feel here” said McCloskey who noted the appeal of the classic brick buildings and the fast-walking Central Northsiders.