From the Carnegie Science Center:

On Thursday, May 19, from 7–9 p.m., Carnegie Science Center will present Drilling Down on the Marcellus Shale: Energy Potential, featuring Lindell Bridges, senior vice president of EQT Production in Pittsburgh. Bridges will lead a riveting discussion about the energy potential of drilling and extracting natural gas from the Marcellus Shale.

This adult-oriented talk is the third in a series that encourages our community to take part in a public forum on a topic central to our region’s environmental and economic future.

The Marcellus Shale, one of the largest reservoirs of unconventional natural gas in the world, is sitting directly under western Pennsylvania. This resource holds the potential to provide our region with a source of energy, jobs, and economic benefits. Its extraction, however, if done without proper safeguards, can result in the degradation of water and air quality, and loss of land use. This talk is geared towards adults and will provide an overview of the potential benefits for the local economy, what drilling would mean for the natural gas industry, and who stands to gain from the Marcellus Shale.

The evening’s featured speaker, Lindell Bridges is a geologist for EQT, an integrated energy company focusing on natural gas located in Pittsburgh. He received his BSc and MSc in Geology from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. After working as an independent consultant for 11 years, Bridges joined Chesapeake Energy in 2002, where he successfully drilled Fayetteville Shale discovery wells in White County, Ark. Since March 2009, he has been responsible for directing the EQT’s geoscience activity in the Appalachian basin. Bridges has worked on projects in Arkansas, Illinois, Michigan, Oklahoma, and Texas.

“It is important that our community is informed about the science-based decisions that impact our lives,” says John Radzilowicz, director of Science and Education at Carnegie Science Center. “The last presentation focused on the environmental impacts of drilling. This session will focus on the potential for helping to meet our nation’s energy demands through the resources trapped in the Marcellus Shale. Giving the public access to information about this important topic will help us decide how Marcellus Shale fits into our region’s future.”

The cost of this program is $12 for members and $15 for non-members. Admission includes coffee and dessert. Registration is available online or by calling 412.237.3400, then press 7.