Above: Mullens on Federal Street will have a comedy club above it.

A new comedy club, Wolfie’s,  will open its doors this weekend above Mullins on the North Shore.

Wolfie’s Comedy is the second comedic venue to come to the Northside since last winter, when Steel City Improv Theater moved in to the former Immanuel Church building in East Deutschtown.

Comedian Matt Wohlfarth, along with producer Bud Adams and 100.7 FM radio personality Bubba Snider, will celebrate the grand opening of Wolfie’s Comedy at Mullen’s Upstairs in North Shore this Saturday, Feb. 18.

“We have a lot of talent [in Pittsburgh],” says Wohlfarth, “A lot of smart comedians and we want to give them a place to call home.”

Wohlfarth and Adams have collaborated professionally for years and decided to open their own club to address the gaps they perceived in Pittsburgh’s current comedy scene.

“We kept saying, ‘If we did it…blah, blah, blah,’” laughs Adams. “Then we realized, ‘Hey. We can put something together here!’”

The pair approached Snider with the idea and were enthusiastically received.“The rooms are just perfect for comedy,” says Wohlfarth of Mullen’s Upstairs, which has locations in both South Side and North Shore.

Wolfie’s Comedy will host shows at both venues, alternating between performances by traveling comedians and Wohlfarth’s own creation: Comic Wars.

            “I like to think of Comic Wars as a cross between Whose Line Is It Anyway? And Nick Cannon’s Wild ‘N Out—though Matt would probably describe it differently,” says Adams.

            Indeed, Wohlfarth describes Comic Wars as a kind of “rap battle” between comedians. The show, which is hosted by a professional comedian, combines aspects of improvisational and stand-up comedy to create a unique and “really interactive” experience for the audience.

            “Comedy has too many rules,” complains Wohlfarth, “Sit down, shut up, no cell phones—I want to have a party atmosphere [to our shows].”

            He and Adams have resolved to bring as many traveling comedians to Pittsburgh as possible, vowing never to repeat a show within the year. Ideally, Adams explains, an audience at Wolfie’s will never be subjected to the same combination of opening and feature acts, which he compares to “going to see a movie three times in a row in the same theater.”

“That kills it for some people,” he adds.

Instead, Wohlfarth and Adams hope to establish an atmosphere of fresh comedy, where local comics will be exposed to new performers and have an opportunity to practice their performance skills on a home stage. The University of Funny, another project of Wohlfarth’s, will offer classes and workshops where local talent can enroll to refine comedic skills. Further information and a schedule of classes can be found online at universityoffunny.com.

“Matt and I love comedy,” concludes Adams, “We want others to love it, too. That’s the most important thing.”

Francesca Fenzi is a senior at Carnegie Mellon University.